Seniors share after high school aspirations

Gonzaga+University+in+Spokane%2C+WA+is+a+private+school+which+Grenz+plans+on+attending+past+high+school.
Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA is a private school which Grenz plans on attending past high school.

Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA is a private school which Grenz plans on attending past high school.

PHOTO COURTESY GONZAGA.EDU

PHOTO COURTESY GONZAGA.EDU

Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA is a private school which Grenz plans on attending past high school.

PJ Sills, Managing Editor

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Dylan Grenz

InFlight: Do you plan on going to college after high school? If so, which one?

DG: “As of right now, I’m planning to attend Gonzaga University.”

InFlight: If attending college, why have you chosen the one that you did, and if not, why have you chosen not to go to college?

DG: “I’ve visited twice and love the campus, they’re a Jesuit school, and they have the major I’m interested in, which is sports management.”

InFlight: Do you feel high schools put too much pressure on students to go to college? Why or why not?

DG: “I think Auburn Riverside specifically does a really good job of presenting plenty of post high school options. I think they present lots of college options because that is what the bulk of students do after high school, but at the same time they also have announcements about the military, etc.”

InFlight: If attending college, what do you plan on studying, and if not, what area of the workforce do you aspire to pursue?

DG: “Sports management.”

InFlight: Why do you feel college is important/unnecessary?

DG: “I think the whole purpose of college is ultimately to prepare you for entering the workforce for the rest of your life.”

InFlight: What is the greatest benefit and most significant detriment of attending college for you?

DG: “Even though college can be costly and present initial drawbacks, the long term benefits are really great.”

 

Liberty Miles

InFlight: Do you plan on going to college after high school? If so, which one?

LM: “I do plan on going to college after high school, but I haven’t decided on which one yet.”

InFlight: If attending college, why have you chosen the one that you did, and if not, why have you chosen not to go to college?

LM: “I am looking at schools with film production programs because that is the career I want to pursue.”

InFlight: Do you feel high schools put too much pressure on students to go to college? Why or why not?

LM: “I don’t really feel like high schools put too much pressure on students, but they could show more options for students who don’t want to or can’t go to college.”

InFlight: If attending college, what do you plan on studying, and if not, what area of the workforce do you aspire to pursue?

LM: “I am planning on studying film and television production.”

InFlight: Why do you feel college is important/unnecessary?

LM: “I feel like college is important because it gives students all the necessary knowledge to pursue whatever career they would like. Also, college is an important time in people’s lives and teaches you how to be an adult.”

InFlight: What is the greatest benefit and most significant detriment of attending college for you?

LM: “For me, I think the most beneficial part of college will be the basic knowledge and techniques I need to know and the connections I will make. The biggest detriment will be my finances, which is a concern for many students.”

 

McKenna Webb

InFlight: Do you plan on going to college after high school? If so, which one?

MW: “Yes, I am currently working on college applications. I am applying to a few Ivy Leagues and a few “mini Ivys.” My dream school is Yale, but I would also love to attend Princeton or Brown.”

InFlight: If attending college, why have you chosen the one that you did, and if not, why have you chosen not to go to college?

MW: “With Ivy Leagues, it’s less about me choosing the university, and more about the university choosing me. However, I am applying to the Ivys for numerous reasons. While I truly love Washington, I feel like the East Coast will help my restless mind thrive. The lifestyle is fast-paced, so it’s perfect for someone like me who always likes to be doing or working on something. While knowing where I wanted my school to be, I also knew pretty early on that I wanted a university with fewer students, small class sizes, and good student-teacher relationships. I still do not see the appeal in being in classes where you have hundreds of classmates and your teacher doesn’t know your first name. I want to be collaborative with my classmates, and making good connections with my teachers has always been important to me. Also important is the school’s curriculum, which is typically categorized as either a core curriculum or a more “open curriculum.” Core curriculums are more structured, with the colleges listing specific classes you must take to graduate. An open curriculum, which I prefer, has distribution requirements, which means that you must take a certain amount of classes within a certain discipline. In a core curriculum, it would list that you must take Physics your Freshman year, for instance, while an open curriculum would simply list that you must complete three science classes by the time you graduate. I think that college is where you can discover yourself and your true passions, so your college credits should be used for exploring those and not for checking boxes. With all this being said, a good number Ivy Leagues fit these preferences of mine perfectly, along with having incredible resources, stunning architecture, and a rich history. Even though they take an extreme amount of work and discipline to get into, I think the Ivy Leagues worth the effort.”

InFlight: Do you feel high schools put too much pressure on students to go to college? Why or why not?

MW: “I think it’s crucial that high schools push kids to go to college. While it may have seemed feasible to survive on a high school diploma in past decades, the workforce has now reached a point where a general college education is almost necessary. Because of increases in technology, many jobs now require more technical training, especially in electronics, and because of competitiveness in employment, people with degrees are getting the jobs that pay livable incomes. Even trying to get an A.A. through Running Start or getting an online degree can completely change how employers view you. And nowadays, colleges offer so much financial aid and scholarship opportunities, along with all of the scholarships from outside organizations, that college can be affordable for practically anyone. Colleges also give young adults life skills that will help them survive the ‘real world,’ that kids right out of high school might have to learn the hard way. College is a good (and increasingly necessary) stepping stone into adulthood. In the end, why wouldn’t you want to go to college? The opportunities that they offer are astonishing, and I won’t miss out on them for anything in the world.”

InFlight: If attending college, what do you plan on studying, and if not, what area of the workforce do you aspire to pursue?

MW: “Although I have a few majors that I am interested in, I have mostly considered being a Computer Science major. It’s clear that the world is dependent on computers now, and that reliance will only strengthen in years to come. Despite this, there is currently a huge absence of computer scientists in the workforce. I already have a strong interest in technology, and I thoroughly enjoyed the computer science classes I took here at Riverside. I think doing computer science is meaningful and rewarding, both for me and for the world, and I would love to be part of something so important for our future.”

InFlight: What is the greatest benefit and most significant detriment of attending college for you?

MW: “The choices you make in college can really shape your entire future. I want to lay a solid foundation for myself and my career, and I want to do it in a field I am interested in. College gives you the time and resources to discover your purpose. If the saying “choose a job you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life is true,” then I think a post-secondary education can assist in leading you to a fulfilling life. On the flip side, I think making students apply for their majors in their general applications or during their Freshman year is a big detriment. We are much too young to be deciding our futures; we can’t possibly know what we want or what’s best for ourselves yet. I appreciate when colleges give you the first year or two to mature and try new things before making that paramount decision.”

 

JT Swepston

InFlight: Do you plan on going to college after high school? If so, which one?

JTS: “I plan to go to Green River for two years, then transfer to a four year university.”

InFlight: If attending college, why have you chosen the one that you did, and if not, why have you chosen not to go to college?

JTS: “I’m choosing to go there because of financial reasons.”

InFlight: Do you feel high schools put too much pressure on students to go to college? Why or why not?

JTS: “I do feel like high schools put too much pressure on going to college because it forces people into a system where not everyone can thrive.”

InFlight: If attending college, what do you plan on studying, and if not, what area of the workforce do you aspire to pursue?

JTS: “I’ll probably major in business and minor in music.”

InFlight: Why do you feel college is important/unnecessary?

JTS: “I feel that it is important to at least attempt college, if you end up figuring out that you like it, that’s cool, if you can’t stand it, then you can always drop out.”

InFlight: What is the greatest benefit and most significant detriment of attending college for you?

JTS: “The biggest benefit would be the larger paycheck later in life so that I don’t have to work my life away, and the biggest detriment would be the fact that my family hasn’t ever really been able to afford sending me to college after my sister used up the majority of my college savings due to student loan processing errors.”

 

 

About the Writer
PJ Sills, Sports Editor

Hi! My name is Phillip Joseph Sills but you can call me PJ; I’m a senior at Auburn Riverside and act as a Staff Reporter of the InFlight Newspaper! I hope that all the hard work of our staff and myself leads to a successful publication that you and your peers can enjoy. In my free time I like to write, (who would’ve thought) sing, act, be a goofball, hang out with friends, and constantly question the ideals of our “lovely” president. Anywho, have a wonderful day and enjoy the news!

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