AR enforcement

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AR enforcement

Annjanettea Doyle, Staff Reporter

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AR time is a 30-minute period where students will be allowed to gain assistance from there teachers if they are struggling in that class. AR has intervention and has enrichment, intervention happens when you get below a C- in a class and you’re assigned to that class that you are struggling with. While enrichment is when a student has a grade above a C-, this means that they get to pick any class they want to go to for 30 minutes, then they get to go to lunch and they can pick which lunch they want to go to. 

With intervention, if you’re assigned to it your teacher will have 1st or 2nd AR time, meaning if you get 1st AR time then you get second lunch. But, there is a problem with this some students just refuse to go to their AR time because they don’t think it serves a big enough purpose.

An issue arisen because of it, students are now signing into there AR time and then leaving. They are either taking both lunches, or they are skipping, or they leave school altogether and don’t come back. Which this causes more problems even more, cause leaving campus brings a whole other set of problems.

Mr. Hunter, the Dean of Attendance said, “Oh yeah, a bunch of reports that [students] are fake going” to there AR time. Which makes it harder for resources like this to be given out to students. Then, there is the issue of being tardy to there AR time.

An easily estimate that Mr. Hunter said, that about “out of 1600 students about 500+ on the daily” are tardy to there AR time. Causing the attendance office to be overrun by students every day. Then look at the teacher’s enforcement of there AR time in their class.

Mr. Rowe said, “about 50/50” of his students takes AR time seriously and about 70 percent [of students] work” during this time. This leaves a remaining 30 percent doing nothing to effectively help themselves.

Mr. Rowe said, that about on estimate “85 percent” of his students show up to there assigned AR time in his class. But, he did say that some students do just come in during his AR time to just chat, which is a common issue in a lot of classes.

     Then Ms. Anderson said that some students don’t need it because they aren’t needing any help so it offers a social aspect. Ms. Anderson said, that her students ask for help during this AR time about “ good 5 to 6 students ask for help and for tests and even more” during her class period.

      An assigned AR time she has is Honor Society on Tuesday and Friday during 2nd AR time so students who are in it are required to show up to it, nearly everyone always shows up. AR time enforcement can be done in many ways and affects students differently but, AR time could be harder and more enforced and stricter as an alternative response to skipping students and tardy students.