Red Bull has been banned in Washington state

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Red Bull has been banned in Washington state

Big Foot Java Lineup PHOTO CREDIT: BIG FOOT JAVA

Big Foot Java Lineup PHOTO CREDIT: BIG FOOT JAVA

Big Foot Java Lineup PHOTO CREDIT: BIG FOOT JAVA

Big Foot Java Lineup PHOTO CREDIT: BIG FOOT JAVA

Myriah Dittmar, Reporter

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Due to major health concerns in middle school and high school students, representatives in Olympia, Washington voted on Tuesday to pass a bill that will make the consumption of the popular energy drink, Red Bull, illegal for persons under the age of 21. Following a report released by the American College of Cardiology in February of 2018, which stated that “the scientific community…[has] expressed safety concerns over energy drinks specifically for vulnerable populations, including those under 18 years of age, pregnant or breastfeeding women, and those with comorbid cardiovascular or other medical conditions,” Washington State legislature pushed to pass bill 1429, which states that Red Bull and other energy drinks like it (those that contain mixtures of caffeine, taurine, and similar energy-inducing drugs) will be treated like alcohol in the eyes of the state. What does this mean, you ask? Well, it means that in order to buy these coveted energy drinks, you will need to show proof of ID that shows that you are 21 or over, and restrictions will be put in place in coffee shops, gas stations, and grocery stores in order to prevent minors from accessing the drinks.

When asked about what she thinks of the new law, 16-year-old Shmelly Shell from Auburn Riverside said “I am truly addicted to caffeine and I don’t think it’s Olympia’s business what I put in my body. They should just butt out and be glad I’m not sniffing cocaine or something like that to get through all their stupid school testing regulations.” Shell’s thoughts seem to be echoed by her peers at Riverside, as students look at their half-filled cups from popular drink stands like Jump N’ Bean and Big Foot in horror. Parents, however, are rejoicing. Tiffaney Stenvers, mother of Myriah Stenvers, a senior at Riverside, says that she has been trying to get her daughter to stop drinking Red Bull because she is worried of the health side effects.

 

Disclaimer: All information in this article is fake. This is a satire article.